EKZO: Modular

A modular wearable which uses interchangeable part/tools in order to restore and/or enhance hand functionality in those who suffer disabilities.

What is it?

EKZO is a modular wearable which uses interchangeable part/tools in order to restore and/or enhance hand functionality in those who suffer disabilities (quadriplegia, arthritis, Parkinson’s disease, congenital malformations, etc.). These parts are activated using wireless sensors designed and tailored to each user, and are used to perform simple and complex tasks.

How is it used?

This wearable is used as a hand bracelet. It includes wireless sensors in order to activate it. These activation sensors come in different shapes, sizes and triggers. They can be used as clips, wristbands, headbands, etc.

What technologies does it incorporate?

EKZO uses Arduino and wireless data transmission (XBEE modules) in its main bracelet. The activation sensors range from pressure sensors to voice activation to blowing sensors. Each one is adapted to the user’s specific needs and limitations.

How does it work?

The user carries a bracelet in their hand/s, which through a servo motor allows the tool to function. Using any specific sensor, a wireless signal is transmitted to the main device that open/close the pincers/tools.

Working device: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QKRrN_1RXqY

Who uses it?

People who suffer from hand disabilities (quadriplegia, arthritis, Parkinson’s disease, congenital malformations, etc.).

Why does it help?

EKZO gives back some of the basic hand functions: holding and drinking from a cup for, grabbing a book, brushing their teeth or even cooking!This daily activities may sound trivial, but are life changing for those who can’t do it by themselves.


Team

Team's Location

Chile

Team's Occupation

University Students

Team Members

Martín Schwarzenberg Klein, Carlos De Martini, Javier López, Claudio Arriaza

Focus Area(s)

Alert/Response, Diagnosis/Treatment/Referral

UNICEF Pillar(s)

Social Inclusion



These pages have been pulled directly from applications submitted to the Wearables for Good Challenge in 2015. They represent the work of the individual teams and have subsequently not been edited.

Comments

Write a Comment

ALL PROJECTS